Tri, tri, tri again!

So if you’ve been following this blog for the last few weeks you may have noticed a common link between the last 3 posts. A little town called Victor Harbor. 3 weeks ago I participated in the Victor Harbor Triathlons, a week later I was back again for the last race in the Yumigo! Summer Trail Series and then just last weekend I was back yet again for The Granite Island Run.

Well, I was lured back down there again this Easter weekend by a very intriguing invitation from Victor triathlete (and ultramarathoner!) Shane. A Triple Mix triathlon.

What is a Triple Mix triathlon, you say? I wondered the same, and I had to Google!

It is essentially 3 triathlons, with 10 minutes break in between.

  • Stage 1 – Swim (300m), Bike (6km), Run (2km)
  • Stage 2 – Run (2km), Bike (6km), Swim (300m)
  • Stage 3 – Bike (6km), Swim (300m), Run (2km)

In the Super League format, the 10 minute timer starts when the first athlete finishes the stage. However, in this (informal, trial) event, it would be as the LAST athlete crosses the line, meaning the faster athletes get a longer break, and even the slowest athlete gets 10 minutes. (I’m glad that change was made to the format otherwise I probably wouldn’t have made it to the second stage!)

I thought, sounds like fun, let’s do it!

This would be my third triathlon. (And possibly fourth and fifth as well, depending on how you look at it!) My first was at West Lakes in November and my second was the aforementioned one at Victor 3 weeks ago.

Given the length of the swim, and also the logistics of having the swim as NOT the first leg in the second two stages, it was pretty obvious even to me, the total noob, that wetsuits would not work in this format! That was one less thing I had to remember to bring!

I decided to make a day of it and go to parkrun in the morning. Victor is a nice flat out and back course, and FAST (unless you’re unlucky enough to encounter a fierce headwind one way, which often happens!) I was there in plenty of time, I was not going for a PB (I’m a long way off PB pace!) but I always like to race Victor hard. As it happens I missed the start as Simon had asked me to hold his 2 dogs’ leads for him while he got himself organised, and the start took a lot of us by surprise! I ended up starting about 12 seconds after the main group, meaning I had to work hard to get closer to the front where I could stretch the legs out a bit (always good after an 80 minute drive!) Shane had jokingly said before the start that I would do 22 minutes, which I thought was way ambitious, but my watch at the end showed 22:07 (my official time being a bit slower than that) which I put down to the ideal running conditions AND the fact that I had to play catch-up for at least the first half! So ironically, starting late PROBABLY resulted in my getting a better time than I otherwise would have!

Nothing left in the tank!

parkrun was followed by coffee and delicious hot chips at the Yilki Store which was super busy – no doubt because of the long weekend and the fact that Victor is a popular holiday destination for Adelaide people! (Victor Harbor parkrun had a record attendance of 170 – it seemed like ALL of them were there at coffee!)

Then I spent the day wandering around town, town was buzzing as it was Easter weekend and there happened to be a big Easter hunt happening, involving a large number of families! I hit up a few op shops, a few other shops and had a lovely vegan burger at a place called Primal Bliss. And almost everywhere I went, I ran into Simon and Shane’s parents! I wasn’t stalking, I promise!

Cool artwork at the Victor Harbor Artisans Market!

I then made my way to the reserve where I had last been 3 weeks ago, for the triathlon. I won’t bore you with details of all the 9 legs and 6 transitions, I’ll just cover the highlights this time!

There were 4 of us at the start of the triathlon – I was the only female. The other 3 were Shane, his younger brother Ben (Mr Mekong, visiting from Melbourne) and another guy Chad who I hadn’t met before. Shane’s son Finn would join us for the second stage.

I was the first to rack my bike, so I had to ask the awesome timekeeper and helper Jono which way around the bike goes! (Normally I’m not the first person to rack my bike so I just copy what other people have done!) He noticed both my tyres were a bit low on air so very kindly pumped them up for me! I didn’t really need any more disadvantage than I already had!

The bike compound! My bike closest to camera, Jono right of shot pumping up my tyres! Ben (left, in super fast Mekong trisuit) and Chad getting ready!

Stage 1 was the traditional swim/bike/run, with the swim starting in the water, as it had 3 weeks ago. Very quickly the 3 other guys put a bit of distance between themselves and me! They were going to get a nice long rest after Stage 1…

My watch doesn’t do swimming very well. I am pretty sure my swim was not THAT wonky!

The bike course was nice and simple – I had asked Shane to show me on a map so I could visualise it for myself, not being a local and not being all that familiar with the town (despite having spent quite a bit of time there in the past month!) It was a T shaped course – along Bartel Blvd, left at the roundabout to where parkrun starts (one part of town I am VERY familiar with!) and then a U-turn, along the seafront Franklin Parade, and then another U-turn at Nevin St, back along Franklin and left up Bartel and back to the start. I need to work on my U-turns! I had to slow down a fair bit, not that it would have made any difference!

The un-get-lost-on-able bike course!

The run was even simpler, just under 2km, out and back along Matthew Flinders Drive, with a U-turn at the roundabout at Tabernacle Rd (which, for the record, does NOT have any street signs indicating the name of the road!) The guys were well ahead of me and were on their way back as I was on my way out. Shane was leading and he told me to turn at the “Keep Left” sign, rather than going all the way around the roundabout. I guessed by how far I’d run, that the roundabout where I turned WAS actually the right one, and as it turned out, it was!

A MUCH more straightforward run than in the Victor Harbor Triathlons!

Stage 1 complete, a nice 10 minute rest, time to re-set my Garmin for the next stage (reverse of Stage 1: run, bike, swim). Miraculously, after several failed attempts, I had FINALLY managed to correctly record a multisport event on my Garmin! Given that we finished Stage 1 with the run and Stage 2 started with the run, there wasn’t even any gear changing to do!

The guys were nice enough to let me lead out the run, and I was first into transition. The lead didn’t last long – Shane came into transition seconds after me, and the other two guys overtook me on the bike within a few hundred metres of my leaving transition!

And that was the last time I was in front for the day!

After another uneventful bike ride (the best kind!) it was time for my first ever bike to swim transition! (I’d done all the other transitions before, in triathlon/aquathlon/duathlon, but never this one!) Rack the bike (thanks to Jono for the tips on that!), shoes off, helmet off (would have looked a bit silly going into the water with the helmet on!) grabbed goggles, and started running to the water. Sunnies still on, thanks Jono for reminding me to take them off! Back into the water, to swim another 300m. This swim was a bit slower, probably because I wasn’t following closely behind fast swimmers, I was just doing my own thing. Actually this swim felt easier than the first one, probably because mentally I was prepared that once I’d finished, it was time for another break!

Amazingly enough, my overall time for Stage 2 was 1 second faster than the first one! So if nothing else, I am consistent!

I got a few more tips from Jono during the break. Firstly, to put my head under water in the swim, as lifting my head would cause my legs to drop. I was already aware of this, and I thought I was putting my head in, but then I realised I was looking up way too much, to try to see where I was going. The second tip was to put my goggles in the pocket in the back of my trisuit, so they’d be ready to go once I got off the bike. (Ben had done this in Stage 2).

Stage 3 (the last one) was Bike/Swim/Run. The bike started with a rolling start, we started riding up Bartel Blvd until a particular tree, or car, or side street, indicated that it was time to start racing. Aaaaaand I never saw the other guys again! Actually that’s not true, I saw them coming back along Franklin Pde as I was heading out. Also on Franklin Pde I saw a familiar face, David, a running friend from Adelaide. Actually I recognised his car and then called out to him as I rode past. Small world!

I came back into transition, racked my bike and ran down to the water. Jono told me to head to the left of the buoy, as Marcus was out there moving it back in closer for me. The other guys had already finished their swim, and I believe the buoy had been moved further away for them, maybe to even the playing field a bit? Or maybe just to mess with them? Either way, I was grateful it was moved back for me – I’m not sure I was up for a longer swim!

I made a conscious effort to put my head in the water more, I decided to lift my head every 4th breath (instead of every breath as I had previously been doing). I breathe on both sides, so I breathe every 3rd stroke. So that meant I was looking up every 12th stroke. I figured, at the glacial speed at which I move in the water, I wasn’t going to veer too far off course in 12 strokes! It seemed to work well – I don’t think I was any faster, but there may have been an element of fatigue there! It’s definitely something I will be practising!

As I passed the second buoy and headed in towards the beach, my goggles were full of water. I gave up, took them off and swam a little bit with my head out. I then decided that I had WAY too far to go, to be able to do that! So I stopped, emptied my goggles and went back to swimming properly.

And then my hand touched the bottom and I was back in comfortable territory – feet on the ground, running the last metre or so out of the water, across the beach and back to the bike rack where I quickly donned my shoes, hat and sunnies, and headed out for the last leg of the last stage – the best one, the run!

My last run was faster than my second run (the second run, remember, being the first leg of Stage 2, so I WAS holding back a bit) but slower than my first. My overall time was slower than the first two stages (not surprising!) but there was only 24 seconds difference between the 3 stages, so I’m pretty happy with that consistency!

It wasn’t a race – but I won on the consistency front! Also I was first female finisher in all 3 stages 🙂

And then it was time to relax and have a chat with the other guys about the event. I was interested to find out how it would work in a ‘proper’ event, ie how would you decide the winner? Would it be on overall combined times, or just the winner of the last race? Apparently one of the formats eliminates the slowest competitors in each stage, so I would have not got past Stage 1!

Relaxing at the end of a very fun and challenging event!

I would definitely be keen to do something like this again, it was a great challenge, I learned a LOT (including the fact that I obviously need a Mekong trisuit if I want to get faster!), and it was interesting to see what a difference mixing up the disciplines makes!

Thanks heaps to Shane for organising this event and inviting me to be part of it, to Shane, Ben and Chad (and Finn, who joined us for part of the event) for being great competitors, and to Jono and Marcus for all their help in making this event happen!

Race Report – The Granite Island Run 2018

Another weekend, another trip to Victor! This time for The Granite Island Run.

This event has been going for a few years, but this was the first time I’d done it. I liked the concept – running from the mainland across the causeway to the island, around the island, and back to the mainland. I’d never done a run like that before!

There was a 5k (ish) option and a 10k (ish) option. I sensibly opted for the short option (and as always, if I had a dollar for every time I got asked “Why are you only doing the short one?”, well safe to say I’d have a fair few dollars in my hand!)

The 10k was the same course as the 5k, only when you returned to the mainland within sight of the finish line, you had to make a U-turn and go straight back across the causeway and do another lap of the island! I’m not a huge enjoyer of multi lap races (unless it’s a short loop and shitloads of them – go figure!) so where there is a choice of one lap or two, I’m almost always going to go with the former!

It was a cool morning so I decided arm warmers were definitely required, and I went with a slightly modified version of my Boston Marathon kit – I omitted the calf sleeves and instead of wearing the top with my name emblazoned across the front, I wore the same top but WITHOUT the name. I thought it might have been too much big-noting to rock up with my name on at a smallish event where I probably would know a big chunk of the runners anyway!

I left home around 6am, arriving in Victor a touch before 7:30. It was quite cold so I had a couple of extra layers on while awaiting the start! I was happy to see some discounted event tees from previous years, at the bargain basement price of $10, so of course I had to buy one!

A number of friends from Adelaide had made the trip down for the event, and many of them had stayed overnight and made a weekend of it. It’s always nice to go to a run in a different location and see so many familiar faces there!

We all made our way over to the start line where the 10k runners were about to start. The run started with a quick out and back, along the waterfront and onto the causeway where the runners quickly became little dots in the distance!

It wasn’t long before it was our turn. RD Simon gave us the briefing which included the fact that the finish line was just at the end of the causeway, not back at the start. That was good to know, and presumably the finish line would be easy to find! He also told us that it was ‘essentially’ a closed course, meaning that there would not be many other people on the island. Which was good, because as someone who is unfamiliar with the area, I could reasonably confidently follow another runner, and know that they were most likely also part of the race and not just a random! (I couldn’t assume they knew the way, of course!)

We made our way to the start line and away we went. There were 50 starters in the 5k (96 in the 10k) and I didn’t know too many of the others (most of the runners I knew were doing the 10k!). The familiar faces were Justin and Kelly (who were planning to do it as a run/walk), Kate (who was injured so thought she may well be walking a lot of it too!) and Finn (son of Shane and nephew of RD Simon). There was also Tracey, but she was starting late, along with Sheena in the 10k, because she had been up all night doing ultramarathon training – 42km out on the trails! (And I thought my wine tasting marathon yesterday was hardcore!)

Ahead of me at that stage was a young girl called Matilda who I had heard about from Simon the week before, apparently very fast! There was also another girl ahead of me who I passed on the causeway, so I knew I was in 2nd place.

Early days, just about to run out and back along the jetty. Thanks to Ian for this photo!

The first highlight of the run was when we ran to the end of a jetty, turned around and ran straight back. As a smallish event, I was a fair way behind the next person, so it wasn’t clear until I got there, where the turnaround point was. There was a turnaround arrow right near the end of the jetty, with a very helpfully positioned ‘X’ (signifying ‘Wrong Way’) at the very end of the jetty. Pretty sure no-one was tempted to go that way but thanks to whoever put that there, it gave me (and others too, I’m sure!) a good laugh!

It was one of these 3. Thanks guys! 🙂

Then the hard work began. A bit of uphill and quite a lot of stairs. I managed to run all of the hills but I did have to resort to walking about 3/4 of the way up the stairs. I don’t actually think I was any slower walking than running up the stairs!

There was one drink station on the route, manned by Shane and family, among others! I don’t recall EVER taking a drink in a 5k run before, but on this particular occasion it seemed like the thing to do! And knowing that we’d be coming back past this drink station again shortly, I was happy to hold onto my cup and drop it in the bin next time around. It was quite a windy day, and I know how annoying it is as a volunteer to pick up cups that have been dropped near (but not in) bins! We ran down a hill, then turned around and ran straight back up again. I dropped my cup in the bin at the drink station, contemplated taking another one but then decided against it, and just after I ran past, Shane told me to come back for a photo as he’d just missed getting a shot (obviously I was running too damn fast hahaha!) to which I laughed and replied “No way!”

We started seeing some of the 10k runners (and Tracey!) – that was a nice touch, it’s always great to see other runners out on the course.

Every time we came to a turnaround I had a look to see who was behind me. (Podium finishes don’t come along all that often, so I was determined to hold onto my place if at all possible!) The girl who I had passed to move into 2nd place, seemed to be relatively close behind me. Close enough that I wasn’t going to relax, or walk up any hills!

Not long before we left the island. I think this photo was taken by Isabella. Looking pretty happy here! Just behind me is Laura, wearing the same Mekong top as me! It wasn’t planned! Although, Laura’s 2 running buddies Katie and Sarah were also both wearing the same top. I’m pretty sure that WAS planned 🙂

Before too long the causeway was in sight – the finish line was near!

On the causeway we hit a bit of a headwind, that was really the only time when the weather was a factor in the whole race, so you’ve gotta be happy with that! I had another sneaky look behind me. I couldn’t see anyone, so I thought I was safe.

We reached the end of the causeway. I could see a sign up ahead, pointing one way for the long course and one way for the short course. I wanted to be sure I went the right way! I guess the flags and the timing mat should have been a clue! (Can’t be too careful though!)

I crossed the line, just a touch over 27 minutes (my watch showed the distance as 5.38km) – ‘only’ just over 2 minutes behind Matilda in 1st place! Less than a minute behind me was Karen in 3rd – she was not the one I’d passed early on. All this time I had been looking out for the girl in the red shirt and totally had no idea that there was someone else pretty close behind me!

I loved the course, such a unique event, and amazingly, for the second week in a row down that way, the weather was nowhere near as bad as forecast!

There IS actually an island there. Strava makes it looks like I just swam 5km!

The volunteers were fabulous – thanks to everyone who made this event happen!

After the race I hung around the finish line for a while to cheer on some of the other runners.

And be part of one of Ali’s legendary group selfies!

Then I went to give the credit card a workout at the Mekong pop-up store which was (along with the mobile coffee van) definitely the place to be! I bought a hoodie and a beanie – probably would have been useful BEFORE the run as well, but oh well, next time! (Plus, winter is coming!) And Shane tried REALLY HARD to talk me into buying a tri-suit – as awesome as their tri-suit looks (and apparently performs, according to all reports), I already have a tri-suit, and I’ve literally worn it three times. Can’t quite justify getting another one so soon! Maybe if I do Murray Man

As I was just finishing up my purchase I could hear applause – damn, nearly missed the presentations! Firstly the placegetters in the 5k and 10k were announced (Adelaide friends Brody and Max both placed in the 10k) and the medals were really cool – made of wood!

I’m not sure if you can call a wooden medal ‘bling’ – doesn’t sound right! A beautiful medal nonetheless and I’m going to say well earned 🙂

And then of course the real reason people were hanging around – the random prize draw! I was lucky enough to win a T-shirt from Mekong (lucky because the 20 or so people who were drawn out before me had already left, and you have to be present to win!) so as soon as the draw was over I went straight back to the Mekong tent to pick up a nice new T-shirt! So I did very well today, I spent $80 and got 2 T-shirts, a hoodie and a beanie!

Thanks again to all of the volunteers, and congratulations to Simon and team for putting on this fantastic event! I will definitely be back! (And yes, I will probably be doing the short course again, in case you were wondering!)

Ahh, Victor, you make me want to keep coming back! I guess I’ll be back again next weekend then! 🙂

Race report – Goolwa Huff N’ Puff

Yesterday I drove 180km roundtrip to run 3.5km.
Sounds crazy, right?
Remember this is the same person who drove 500km for a parkrun!
Yesterday’s event was the Goolwa Huff N’ Puff, a race against the Oscar W paddle steamer, to celebrate Oscar’s 109th birthday. There were a whole lot of festivities happening in the wharf precinct as part of the celebrations.
I had heard about the race through Facebook, it was organised by Simon, a fellow vegan/health professional/runner who is slowly morphing into a triathlete. There was a 3.5km one way race against the paddle steamer, as well as a 7km out and back. I decided to do the 3.5km as I have been regularly running a fast 4k and 5k but 7k is that little bit too far for me to be ‘racing’ at the moment!
Quite a few people I knew were running/walking – Denis and Sara (who had started my running journey nearly 5 years earlier!), a few people backing up after Yurrebilla last week (Tim, Steve, Sam and Claire) as well as Ros and Roger, Michelle and Daniel, and Dani who was walking with her daughter. Many of them, like me, had just driven down in the morning!
It didn’t help that daylight saving started yesterday, which meant we lost an hour’s sleep. Luckily the 7k started at 9am and the 3.5k an even more civilised 9:15am!
I did toy with the idea of running it in my tiger onesie if Richmond won the Grand Final but I decided against it. It was still in my car just in case I changed my mind at the last minute, but in hindsight it would have been a bad idea!
I got to the finish area around 8:30 to get my bib, and decided that the best way to get to the 3.5km start (and 7km turnaround) was to run there. I needed to do a warmup anyway!
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Our main ‘competition’ in the race!
The Oscar W wasn’t quite at the start line by the time we started at 9:15, but our other water-based rivals, the Coorong Dragons in their dragonboat, seemed very eager to get going!
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I suspect the dragonboaters may have exceeded the 4 knot limit! This was just before the start of the 3.5k race.
Before we started, some of the faster 7km runners reached the turnaround, led by Denis and a very fast woman, who I later found out was Olympic race walker Claire Tallent!
There were a few fast kids ahead of me when we started, one of whom I quickly passed, but I was never able to catch the other one!
Before we started, Roger said there was a head wind on the way back – and he was right! It wasn’t super strong but it did have an impact. Probably more of an impact on the boats, though!
Being only 3 and a bit kilometres, the run was over pretty quickly! I passed Michelle who ended up 2nd female in the 7km event. She later said she kept me in sight and it was good to have someone to follow!
I could hear breathing down my neck, I could tell it was a guy but I still didn’t want him to pass me! He did eventually get past me with about 1km to go but he did give me someone to follow, as the lead runner had disappeared out of sight!
This was the first time ever that I had run the entire course in reverse before the actual race, so I knew when I was approaching the finish! I had a sneaky peek over my shoulder and couldn’t see anyone, so I waited until I got onto the grass before I picked up the pace.
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Thanks to Krystal Hunt for this pic – can’t even see the paddle steamer or the dragonboat in this shot!
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Those finish line feels! Thanks to Ian Porteous for this photo!
It was cool to be able to see the paddle steamer and the dragon boat finish – the latter winning that particular race (only just!)
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Photo finish!
It was a really cool concept for a fun run – something I’d never done before and would definitely do again! Thanks to organisers Simon and Andrew as well as all the volunteers for making this thoroughly enjoyable event happen!
Afterwards I joined in a ‘Come and Try’ dragonboating session which was challenging and fun! And I got to work my upper body and rest my legs a bit!
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And now for something completely different!
The markets were pretty cool too! All in all, a lovely day!
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Bling for all finishers – a nice touch!